Virginia Pioneers


Accomack County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates

Accomack County Accomac Shire was established in 1634 as one of the original eight shires of Virginia. The name comes from the Native American work Accawmack, meaning on the other side. In 1642 the name was changed to Northampton. Northampton was then divided into two counties in 1663. The northern section assumed the original Accomack name, the southern, Northampton. In 1670, the virginia Colony's Royal Governor William Berkeley abolished Accomack county, but the Virginia General Assembly re-created it in 1671. The justices of Accomac held their terms of court for many years at Pungoteague in the tavern belonging to John Cole, who did not charge for this use. In 1677 it was decided to erect a court-house where the majority of the freeholders chose. Cole, reminding the judges of his liberality, asserted that, having recently purchased the Freeman plantation, he was sure that it would offer a very convenient site for the projected county seat. He also offered to furnish thirty thousand bricks for the construction and also all of the timber. These bricks were to be burned on the spot by James Ewell, who was indebted to Cole. Three years passed and the projected structure had not been completed. In 1680, there was an order of the court directing Major Charles Scarborough to engage workmen at once to proceeding with the construction. Source: Letter of John Cole dated Dec. 20, 1677, Accomac County Records, vol. 1676-8, p. 97. Virginia Historical Tidbits. Join our free blog

Accomack County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Transcripts of County Wills, Inventories, Appraisements, Divisions 1729 to 1737

Ardies, Edward, inventory | Armitrader, Henry | Ash, Bridget | Ashly, Charles | Aymes, James | Bagwell, Henry | Bagwell, John, inventory | Baily, Richard | Baker, John, appraisement | Beavans, William | Bensten, Ambrose | Benstene, James | Benston, James | Benstone, William | Biddle, Thomas, inventory | Blake, John, inventory | Blake, Joseph | Bonnewell, John, division | Bonwell, John, inventory | Bowles, Daniel, inventory | Bradford, William | Brittingham, John, inventory | Brittingham, Nathaniel, Jr. | Brittingham, Samuel, estate | Brymer, Samuel | Bundock, Richard | Burton, Samuel, division | Burton, Thomas | Burton, William | Cole, Robert, appraisement | Copes, Giles | Crippen, Thomas | Cropper, Edmund Bowman, inventory | Croston, Francis | Custis, Hancock | Custis, Henry | Custis, John | Curtler, Richard | Darby, Daniel | Davis, Samuel, inventory | Dix, William | Drumond, Anne, Sr. | Drummond, Hill | Drummond, Richard | Duberly, John, inventory | Dunton, Waterfield, inventory | Edwards, Evan | Ewell, Mark, inventory | Ewell, Solomon | Flack, Mary, inventory | Fletcher, Thomas | Fletcher, William | Gibson, James | Gore, William | Green, John, inventory | Griffin, Elizabeth | Harmanson, Argol | Harmanson, Barbara | Harristoy, John | Heath, William, inventory | Hinman, Benjamin | Hope, Thomas | Huebanks, Mary | Hughs, Joseph, inventory | Hutchinson, John | Jackson, Elizabeth | Jackson, Henry, inventory | Jackson, John | Jenkinson, Thomas | Johnson, George | Johnson, John | Jones, Richard | Justice, Ralph | Kellam, Edward | Kellam, Richard | Knight, George, inventory | Laughlan, Cornelius | Lewis, Elizabeth | Linsey, Elizabeth | Longo, James | Lurton, William, inventory | Major, William | Marshall, John | Mathews, William | Melson, John | Mercy, John | Michael, Simon, inventory | Milby, Garrison | Milby, John, inventory | Milby, Salathiel, inventory | Murray, John | Murrough, Daniel, inventory | O'Grahan, Daniel | Osburne, Jenifer | Owen, Timothy, inventory | Park, Mary | Parker, Dorothy | Parker, George | Patrick, John | Phillips, William Sr. | Powell, John, inventory | Pritchard, William | Pruitt, Catherine, inventory | Read, Henry | Richerson, Charles, inventory | Rite, William | Robins, Edward | Robins, John | Robins, Thomas, inventory | Rogers, John, inventory | Rogers, Peter | Rogers, William | Rowles, Major | Rowles, Daniel Sr. | Sallisbury, John, inventory | Savage, John | Savage, Mary, inventory | Savage, Rowland | Scarburgh, Bennet | Scarburgh, Henry | Scot, Thomas, inventory | Smith, Valentine, inventory | Smith, William, appraisement | Snead, Charles (Capt.), inventory | Solsbery, John | Stockley, Joseph Sr. | Taylor, Charles | Taylor, Joshua, inventory | Taylor, Thomas, appraisement | Taylor (orphan) | Teackles, Margaret | Teackles, Thomas | Tellott, James | Thomson, John, inventory | Tomson, John | Townson, Thomas, inventory | Walker, Joseph | Wallop, Skinner | Watson, Benjamin | Watts, Esther, inventory | Watts, John, inventory | Watts, Priscilla | Watts, William, inventory | Watts, William, orphan | Welburne, Daniel | Welburne, Samuel, inventory | West, Edward, inventory | West, John | West, William | Willis, Daniel, inventory | Wilson, Henry, inventory | Wimbrough, William, appraisement | Windom, George | Young, Francis

Marriages Indexes to Probate Records Miscellaneous


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The Littleton Family Stronghold

Magothy Bay Many genealogists have attempted to unravel the extensive families of Littleton in the Accomack/Northampton Counties region of Virginia, of which Southy Littleton appears to be an early immigrant. Southy was a large landowner of Virginia and Maryland real estate. He may have also owned an estate in Albany, New York on the Hudson River where he died in 1679. His last will and testament was sent to Accomack County for probate, apparently because he owned vast acreage there. He bequeathed over 4000 ares of land on Magothy Bay in Northampton County to his eldest son, Nathaniel Littleton. His youngest son Southy Littleton, was bequeathed 2270 acres at Nandua presumably Nandua Creek. Nandua appears to be in Painter, Virginia. Nandua Creek It appears that he owned over 7200 acres of land in Northampton County, with vested interests in Somerset County, Maryland as well. Southy Littleton Sr. was undoubtably the wealthiest man of that era. Source: Northampton County Wills on Virginia Pioneers

The Dreams of your Ancestors

By Jeannette Holland Austin Jeannette Holland Austin(Profile)

Tracing ancestors is more than just charts of names. And it is not a picture of a leaf, or tree, but rather real people who existed. Many people trace their ancestry to patriots of the American Revolution and to the first Colonists to America. But there is one thing certain: somewhere, someone immigrated to this country and began writing the story of their lives. It all begins in county records, where the first land grant was acquired or deed filed of record. Then taxes were paid and recorded on tax digests. Sons and daughters were given in marriage and these certificates filed. Later on, people died, leaving estates to be dealt with. Wills, inventories, sales, receipts and annual returns surrounded this process, all filed in the county court house. Dreams of the Past It is where the genealogist begins to unravel the details of a story somewhat inconsistent with family legends and tales. It is the truth. In essence, it is a gift bequeathed to all of the heirs going forward. By that, I mean that the eyes of your descendants will have privy to the information hundreds of years into the future. For this reason, it is also your story.

Perhaps now is a good time to discover the details of the dreams of your ancestor, the love which he bore his children., and the heritage bequeathed to you.

News of the Day

"The storehouse and stock of goods valued at $12,000, belonging to D. H. Johnson located at Leemont Accomac County, Virginia has been destroyed by fire; insurance, $3,000." Surces: The Reformed World, Winder, Georgia. Sept. 30, 1891.

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Accomack County
Accomack County